University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Current Projects

 

DYADIC WORRY

Multimethod Assessment of Dyadic Worry Utilizing Self-report, Observational, and Physiological Measurement Tools

This study examines potential physiological correlates of worry, dyadic worry, and anxiety in anxious friend pairs.

Dyadic Peer Interactions as a Risk Factor in Anxiety

This observational study is enrolling best friends from ages 17-24 to participate in a lab-based study to discuss their worries. The goal is to examine the induction of a dyadic interchange focusing on co-worry as a possible “contagion” for anxiety.

Dyadic’s Worry Differential Relationship to Anxiety Symptoms and Specific Relationships

This study explores the relationship of dyadic worry to both generalized and social anxiety symptoms in a large sample of late adolescents. Relationships with both peer friends and parents are investigated.

Longitudinal Impact of Co-worry on Anxiety and Depression

This study examines the short-term longitudinal relationship between the dyadic processes of co-worry and co-rumination, and the cognitive factors of worry and rumination, as they impact anxiety and depression.

 

ATTENTION BIAS

Stability of Attention Allocation and the Longitudinal Relationship to Anxiety

This study examines the short-term stability of attention allocation and its ability to prospectively prediction of anxiety, depression, and anger.

Attention Bias Dosage in Anxiety Study

This experiment examined three dosages of attention bias training versus a placebo control in high social anxiety emerging adults. Manuscript under review.

 

MEASUREMENT DEVELOPMENT

DSM-5 Primary Care Assessment

An ongoing study in collaboration with Hartford Hospital examines the psychometric properties of a community mental health screening measure consistent with RDoC guidelines.

Dyadic Worry 

Psychometric development of dyadic worry questionnaires. This ongoing line of research seeks to establish co-worry as an interpersonal risk factor for worry and anxiety in emerging adults and adolescents (under review), and potential longitudinal reciprocal relationships between these factors (manuscript under preparation).